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Print-Ready Art Requirements

In order for your jobs to turn out correctly, all art files must be prepared correctly.
This means they will need:

Bleed Marks
Crop Marks
Fonts Embedded or Converted to Curves
No Overprint
Linked Graphics
CMYK Format for Full Color Jobs
Separations for Spot Color Jobs
Submitted as PDF

Below is a tutorial to help you prepare your files with bleed and crop marks to meet our requirements.

What is a bleed?

Bleed is the part of the image or background color that runs off the edge of the printing area of a document before the document is trimmed down to size. The purpose of the bleed is so that there is margin for paper shift in the printer and room for design inconsistencies. It also allows room for human error when stacking the papers for final cutting. It ensures that there is no blank or unfinished edge in the finished project. Jet Press recommends an eighth of an inch bleed.  Your finished product should look like this:

Template-BC

How to prepare a file for print in InDesign:

When you create a document in InDesign you can have the program automatically set up a bleed area that extends past the final document size.  When the window pops up for a New Document, you click the “More Options” button to the right. At the bottom it will say Bleed and Slug. In the row for bleed you type in .125in in the first box and when you click off that box it will fill that amount in for the other sides of the document. A box with a red outline will appear an eighth of an inch away from the workable area. The artwork and any colors must either fill up to this line or extend past it.

InDesign 1

To export the image as a PDF with crop and bleed marks, you go to the Menu tab and click Adobe PDF Presets. Select High Quality Print. In the menu at the left, click Marks and bleed. You then check the boxes for “Crop Marks” and “Bleed Marks” and select “Use Document Bleed Settings”. If you forgot to set up bleed lines in your document, then you can type in .125in in the boxes.

Indesign 2

How to prepare a file for print in Illustrator:

We discourage preparing files in Illustrator because crop marks can’t be added and customers will incur a $5 fee for us to add them.
When you create a document in Illustrator you can have the program automatically set up a bleed area that extends past the final document size.  When the window pops up for a New Document, you click the “More Options” button to the right. At the bottom it will say Bleed and Slug. In the row for bleed you type in .125in in the first box and when you click off that box it will fill that amount in for the other sides of the document. A box with a red outline will appear an eighth of an inch away from the workable area. The artwork and any colors must either fill up to this line or extend past it.

Illustrator 1

To save the image as a PDF with bleed marks, you go to the Menu tab and click Save As and then select Adobe PDF. In the menu at the left, click Marks and bleed. You then check the boxes for “Trim Marks” and “Use Document Bleed Settings”. If you forgot to set up bleed lines in your document, then you can type in .125in in the boxes.

Illustrator 2

How to prepare a file for print in Photoshop:

We discourage preparing files in Photoshop because bleed and crop marks can’t be added and customers will incur a $5 fee for us to add them.
When creating a new file, the dpi must be set to 300. To create a bleed in Photoshop the canvas area needs to be slightly larger than the printed area. For an eighth inch bleed, you need to work on a canvas that is a quarter of an inch larger than the desired size. For example, for a 5×7 inch image, you would make it a 5.25×7.25 canvas, keeping in mind that you will lose the outer eighth of an inch all around. When saving, the file must be saved as a PDF.

Photoshop 1

Photoshop 2

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